Thursday, March 12, 2009

Wall Panels


Blue Trees, pair
13" tall x 6.5" wide, approx. each

These panels were completed last year and fired Cone 10 reduction this week. I had a couple of panels crack, one with thicker applied leaves and one which was loaded with shelves too close to one another. Here's a link to show the leaf panels in their green state.


Alder Leaf Panel
14.25" tall by 5.75" wide

I'd prefer my panels be placed randomly throughout the kiln during glaze firing, but I can't seem to get the my idea of distribution of heat and air circulation across to those loading and firing the kiln. They want to put all the narrow shelves bunched together in the kiln and I think that makes for heat too concentrated in small area and therefore slows the cool down. If you have any thoughts on how to effectively load an updraft, gas-fired kiln, please let me know.


Sage Leaf Panel
14" tall by 5.75" wide

In the past I had some of my pieces with large footprints either crack or warp. I conquered the warping by placing a light bed of porcelain sand on the kiln shelf under the pieces during the glaze firing. Maybe I can convince them to load the kiln with air flow in mind.


Pear Leaf Panel
15.5" tall by 6.5" wide

Stay tuned for more work tomorrow. In a day or two I'll post all about how I plan to hang these panels with some great tips I got from Meredith of Whynot Pottery. Here are some roses which grew together in my garden.

7 comments:

  1. Hi Linda- the panels are great and should hang well.
    A tip- I found the larger tiles needed to cure longer after putting on the glue. I also weighted the sticks and glue and then "walk away" and leave them for a few days.
    Then I let them cure about a week until the glue is no longer soft.

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  2. Nice tiles, Linda! I really like the "Sage" tile, something about the very graphic leaves and glaze combo is really attractive.

    As far as loading a gas updraft kiln, I've only participated in a few guild firings, and our kilns are stacked really tight. Smaller, low profile ones on the bottom, tall things on the top. Sounds similar to how your group stacks. I don't know enough about loading a gas kiln to be of much help.

    I'm curious to hear about the hanging method that Meredith recommended - I use gorilla glue which dries in 24 hours, though I have a friend who uses epoxy. With the gorilla glue, you have to be really careful not to use too much, because it will foam an ugly mess.

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  3. oh they turned out so beautifully!!!

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  4. on another note- we load the kiln using different levels to help with air flow. A stack will be something like this:
    9 inches on the bottom
    4 1/2 inches
    6 inches
    4 1/2 inches
    3 inches
    6 inches
    crown somewhere around 14 to 18 inches.
    The next stack stagers the first- does that make sense?

    leave some room at the crown- do not make too tight-
    M

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  5. Hi Meredith, that's exactly how i put the d-hooks on my crosses, I left them in the other room to sit for a while. thanks so much, I'll be doing a post on how you showed me.

    Hi Cynthia, thanks thats a yellow with ohata kaki background which came out more bronze rather than orange, which now that I see it I am glad it did. I won't say I'm happy, but the two plaques that cracked will be my test pieces, I'll post how Meredith showed me.

    Hi Gary, thanks so much, I am really happy with them because they turned out but also because I overcame the difficulties I have had firing large flat pieces without warping in Cone 10 (actually this went to Cone 11).

    Hi Meredith, your description of the load is what my "common sense" tells me would be better for a load - alternating large and small layers and a larger layer on the bottom. They think I'm particular, but now that my flat stuff isn't on the bottom which gets hotter, it isn't warping, the layer of porcelain sand does help too. Thx.

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  6. I love to see the roses...Oh, I can't wait for gardening season!

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  7. Hi Lori, wait till you see my Cecile Brunner arbor when it's in bloom. Only problem is the weeds are starting to grow everywhere now. We're having a great wildflower year and I'll be going out to get some photos later this week.

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I love suggestions, questions, critiques, thanks for your comment