Thursday, December 15, 2011

Malcolm Davis



One of the first clay workshops I took was with Malcolm Davis; sadly he passed away this week. The photo shows two of his shino glazed tea bowls. Malcolm was a full time studio potter since the early 1980's and worked extensively with carbon-trap shino glazes which he said developed best in early and heavy reduction.

At the workshop I attended Malcolm shared freely about his life as a potter and his experiences in the world of clay where he threw multiples of porcelain tea bowls off the hump. Malcolm said early in his career, each time he took a workshop, he was given different and often conflicting advice for working in clay from other ceramists. Malcolm said he learned each ceramic artist must find there own way in working with clay. What I remember best about Malcolm was his humor and kind and gentle nature. 

11 comments:

  1. Hello Linda:
    Sometimes in life one is influenced by another person so deeply that things are never the same again. It would seem that Malcolm Davis was such a role model for you. Although he has now sadly died, we are sure from what you write, that his words and his ways will stay with you for ever.

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  2. how fortunate for you to have gone to one of his workshops. his shino glazes are absolutely amazing.

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  3. I love his shino glazes. Great teacups. It's hard when people who have influenced us pass on. It looks as though you've taken his advice to heart and are finding your own inimitable way. I always like seeing and reading about what's happening in your studio and your life.

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  4. It's so sad that he died but we carry on his life in our celebrations with clay. Sometimes the best stuff to take away from a workshop is not the styles or technique but the ideas and philosophy.

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  5. What a wise and nice sounding man. Lovely that you were able to meet up with Malcolm Davis like that. I first saw his carbon trap shinos in John Britt's cone 10 glaze book, and really, really loved them. Throwing off the hump is good fun, and I've been making goblets that way the last two days... some more again today I hope. Kind thoughts from all of us here, P L NS & G xx

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  6. So sorry for the loss of your friend and teacher.

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  7. Kind & gentle nature. We will never, ever have enough people like that. ~Mary

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  8. what a loss. what a gift that you met him and learned from him. His work is just stunning!

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  9. He made wonderful work with the Shino glazes. The world is a littler poorer at his passing, he was well respected Internationally. It would have been excellent to do a workshop with him.

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  10. His work and his spirit lives on for us to remember him by.

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